April192014
Arthur’s first time dying eggs!

Arthur’s first time dying eggs!

10AM
Posing with the cookies he decorated and saying cheese…all while still licking the excess sprinkles off his fingers.

Posing with the cookies he decorated and saying cheese…all while still licking the excess sprinkles off his fingers.

8AM
The best kind of cooking is the kind that involves a hammer.

The best kind of cooking is the kind that involves a hammer.

April182014
Made new baby a flannel blankie. Now, yellow gingham bias tape or raw edges?  Any opinions? I can’t decide…but I’m scared of bias tape; I’ve never used it.

Made new baby a flannel blankie. Now, yellow gingham bias tape or raw edges? Any opinions? I can’t decide…but I’m scared of bias tape; I’ve never used it.

4PM
“It is not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old, they grow old because they stop pursuing dreams.”

Gabriel García Márquez, Nobel laureate, who passed away on April 17, 2014 at the age of 87.

Here is his NY TImes obituary,

(via obitoftheday)
12PM
Flowers for the Easter table!

Flowers for the Easter table!

9AM
“I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good.” Roald Dahl (via infinityceases)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via themaebee)

April172014
Hard to tell the pretty yellow it is, but baby blanket is moving along! #crochet #madebyme

Hard to tell the pretty yellow it is, but baby blanket is moving along! #crochet #madebyme

7AM

Not only TOMS, but also Starbucks and even Lockheed Martin and Wal-Mart have learned that linking their products to charitable causes makes for good business. We no longer buy only what we need, or even what broadcasts our identity. We buy what makes us feel like good people, and what makes us feel like members of a good, global community. The easy way to look at TOMS is to praise their charitable work. The harder, more troubling way to look at TOMS is to acknowledge it as an example of how corporations have assumed work most often associated with self-identified religious organizations: building community, engaging in charity, and cultivating morals.

TOMS is not alone in its willingness to link progressive social action with consumer spending. In fact, it exemplifies a broader corporate embrace of “conscious capitalism.” Coined by Whole Foods CEO John Mackey, this business model assumes that “the best way to maximize profits over the long-term” is to orient business toward a “higher purpose.” So Starbucks sells coffee to “Put America Back to Work,” the (RED) campaign raises money to fight AIDS, and—in the best example yet—Sir Richard’s Condom Company sends a condom to Haiti for each one it sells (“doing good never felt better”). Meanwhile, Bank of America logos decorate PRIDE banners and Lockheed Martin brags that it is a “champion of diversity.”

The globalization of neoliberal capitalism, and particularly the popularity of “conscious capitalism” as a practice and a discourse, signals a change in the landscape of U.S. religion and politics. “Neoliberalism” most often refers to a loosely cohering set of economic, social, and political policies that (1) seek to secure human flourishing through the imposition of free markets and (2) locate “freedom” in individual autonomy, expressed through consumer choice. But it is also a mode of belonging, where ritual acts of consumption initiate individuals into a global community of consumer agents. Within neoliberal logics of religious and political action, consumer transactions and corporate expansion are recast as forms of spiritual purification and missionary practice. And within conscious capitalism, the “higher purpose” is a world in which all people have a chance (or obligation) to participate in free markets—understood as a multicultural community of consumers.

For Mycoskie—whose title is “Chief Shoe Giver”—building this multicultural community is a theological mandate. He frames his Christian faith as a component of his personal relationship to the company. At the evangelical Global Leadership Conference, keynote speaker Mycoskie answered a question about whether TOMS represents any “biblical principles”: “TOMS represents a lot of different biblical principles. But the one I go back to again and again is the one in Proverbs. Give your first fruits and your vats will be full. … Because we did that and stayed true to our one-to-one model [even amidst financial strain], we’ve been incredibly blessed. We really did give our first fruits.”

In non-confessional settings, TOMS proffers a humanistic version of this prosperity gospel, recast for a neoliberal age. Losing the Bible quotes, the company emphasizes that the “fruits of faith”—in this case, economic success—abound for those who embody the ideals of authenticity, good intentions, and service. Or, “higher purpose” is profitable. TOMS is successful because it creates opportunities for people to live into their own “purpose” through a simple transaction: buying a pair of shoes.

TOMS Shoes and the Spiritual Politics of Neoliberalism  (via lunagemme)

All true. But in the end, he does give a pair of shoes each time one is purchased. It’s not a token $1 of your $100 purchase will be given, or 5% of your total after you spend at least $50. Not that it still isn’t a way to make money. It is. But I feel like TOMS at least is a bit more altruistic than many if the others.

(Source: rs620, via themaebee)

April162014
bound4escape:

Ler Devagar, Portugal

Bookstore in Óbidos, Portugalvia

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Hello gorgeous.

bound4escape:

Ler Devagar, Portugal

Bookstore in Óbidos, Portugalvia

View Post

Hello gorgeous.

(via wbnamerica)

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