April242014
colchrishadfield:

Good morning, Earth! Announcing a new book, full of unpublished space photos, with notes and comments. Coming in October.

I need this.

colchrishadfield:

Good morning, Earth! Announcing a new book, full of unpublished space photos, with notes and comments. Coming in October.

I need this.

April232014
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): William Hartnell (1975)
When William Hartnell was approached by Verity Lambert, the first female producer for the BBC, to take on the role of an alient time traveler for a new science fiction show, he was wary. He considered himself a serious actor and the idea of taking on an unknown role in a show aimed at families and children could have ended his career. But the idea that his two granddaughters would watch him star in the new endeavor outweighed his concerns.
On November 23, 1963, Mr. Hartnell made his first television appearance as Doctor Who in an episode titled “An Unearthly Child.” The show was an immediate success and Mr. Hartnell starred as the Doctor for four seasons. During his tenure, Mr. Hartnell starred in 136 episodes.
It was a long road for Mr. Hartnell to travel. Born to a single mother in 1908, Mr. Hartnell never knew his father. Embarrassed by his upbringing and bullied constantly as a child for being “illegitimate,” he would later make up stories about a father he never knew. He grew up shuttled to different homes as his mother tried to find work, including traveling to Belgium to work as a nurse. Mr. Hartnell even took to shoplifting.
His life changed forever when he was taken in by Hugh Blakner, an artist and philanthropist, who paid for the young Hartnell’s education first as a jockey and then, more significantly, as an actor.
As a teenager he joined a Shakespearean company and worked his way up from stagehand to performer. By the 1930s Mr. Hartnell had found his way into the British film industry making his first on-screen appearance in the 1932 film Say It With Music.
For the next forty years, Mr. Hartnell made numerous appearances in film and television as a supporting player. He is best known, outside of The Doctor, for his role as CSM Bullisom in the BBC comedy The Army Game (1957-1960).But he was noticed for the first time by Ms. Lambert for his portrayal of a rugby coach in the film This Sporting Life (1963).
Mr. Hartnell’s health ended his career as the Doctor. He had developed ateriosclerosis which was effecting him performance physically and mentally. It was at this time that the producers created the idea of “regeneration” which allowed the character to change appearance and personality. This allows different actors to play the role while maintaining continuity. (How James Bond is a more traditional example of changing actors for a role.) Mr Hartnell himself recommended his replacement, Patrick Troughton. The transition from the first to the second Doctor took place on October 29, 1966.
Mr. Hartnell made a few television appearances after leaving Doctor Who but his health limited his performances. Even for The Three Doctors, a 10th anniversary reunion serial, the writers promised his wife Heather* that Mr. Hartnell would sit for most of his time on-screen and read his lines from cue cards.
William Hartnell, the first Doctor, died on April 23, 1975 at the age of 67.
Sources: The Daily Mirror, Wikipedia, and IMDB.com
(Image of Mr. Harnell as Doctor Who during filming in the 1965 serial The Web Planet. It is copyright of BBC and courtesy of neitshade5.wordpress.com)
* The Hartnells married in 1929. And Mr, Hartnell treated her terribly. As told in his biography Who’s There?: The Life and Career of William Hartnell, which was written by his grandddaughter Jessica Carney, Mr. Hartnell was a known womanizer and Mrs. Hartnell tried on several occasions to obtain a divorce. They never separated and were married until he died - 46 years.
Other Doctor Who posts on Obit of the Day:
Caroline John - played “Liz” Shaw, companion of the third Doctor
Raymond Cusick - Creator of the Daleks
Nicholas Courtney - Col. Lethbridge-Stewart
Elisabeth Sladen - Sarah Jane Smith

For themaebee

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): William Hartnell (1975)

When William Hartnell was approached by Verity Lambert, the first female producer for the BBC, to take on the role of an alient time traveler for a new science fiction show, he was wary. He considered himself a serious actor and the idea of taking on an unknown role in a show aimed at families and children could have ended his career. But the idea that his two granddaughters would watch him star in the new endeavor outweighed his concerns.

On November 23, 1963, Mr. Hartnell made his first television appearance as Doctor Who in an episode titled “An Unearthly Child.” The show was an immediate success and Mr. Hartnell starred as the Doctor for four seasons. During his tenure, Mr. Hartnell starred in 136 episodes.

It was a long road for Mr. Hartnell to travel. Born to a single mother in 1908, Mr. Hartnell never knew his father. Embarrassed by his upbringing and bullied constantly as a child for being “illegitimate,” he would later make up stories about a father he never knew. He grew up shuttled to different homes as his mother tried to find work, including traveling to Belgium to work as a nurse. Mr. Hartnell even took to shoplifting.

His life changed forever when he was taken in by Hugh Blakner, an artist and philanthropist, who paid for the young Hartnell’s education first as a jockey and then, more significantly, as an actor.

As a teenager he joined a Shakespearean company and worked his way up from stagehand to performer. By the 1930s Mr. Hartnell had found his way into the British film industry making his first on-screen appearance in the 1932 film Say It With Music.

For the next forty years, Mr. Hartnell made numerous appearances in film and television as a supporting player. He is best known, outside of The Doctor, for his role as CSM Bullisom in the BBC comedy The Army Game (1957-1960).But he was noticed for the first time by Ms. Lambert for his portrayal of a rugby coach in the film This Sporting Life (1963).

Mr. Hartnell’s health ended his career as the Doctor. He had developed ateriosclerosis which was effecting him performance physically and mentally. It was at this time that the producers created the idea of “regeneration” which allowed the character to change appearance and personality. This allows different actors to play the role while maintaining continuity. (How James Bond is a more traditional example of changing actors for a role.) Mr Hartnell himself recommended his replacement, Patrick Troughton. The transition from the first to the second Doctor took place on October 29, 1966.

Mr. Hartnell made a few television appearances after leaving Doctor Who but his health limited his performances. Even for The Three Doctors, a 10th anniversary reunion serial, the writers promised his wife Heather* that Mr. Hartnell would sit for most of his time on-screen and read his lines from cue cards.

William Hartnell, the first Doctor, died on April 23, 1975 at the age of 67.

Sources: The Daily Mirror, Wikipedia, and IMDB.com

(Image of Mr. Harnell as Doctor Who during filming in the 1965 serial The Web Planet. It is copyright of BBC and courtesy of neitshade5.wordpress.com)

* The Hartnells married in 1929. And Mr, Hartnell treated her terribly. As told in his biography Who’s There?: The Life and Career of William Hartnell, which was written by his grandddaughter Jessica Carney, Mr. Hartnell was a known womanizer and Mrs. Hartnell tried on several occasions to obtain a divorce. They never separated and were married until he died - 46 years.

Other Doctor Who posts on Obit of the Day:

Caroline John - played “Liz” Shaw, companion of the third Doctor

Raymond Cusick - Creator of the Daleks

Nicholas Courtney - Col. Lethbridge-Stewart

Elisabeth Sladen - Sarah Jane Smith

For themaebee
April222014
No food sounds good lately, especially not leftovers, so when something does, you seize on it. German apple pancake tonight. I’ve always wanted to make it anyway. It’s delicious. 

And everybody else ate…which means the pan is all mine!

No food sounds good lately, especially not leftovers, so when something does, you seize on it. German apple pancake tonight. I’ve always wanted to make it anyway. It’s delicious.

And everybody else ate…which means the pan is all mine!

4PM
Good thing it’s not too chilly. Someone’s preventing my jacket from buttoning.

Good thing it’s not too chilly. Someone’s preventing my jacket from buttoning.

3PM
So far so good (just be glad you can’t see the edges…) #crochet #madebyme

So far so good (just be glad you can’t see the edges…) #crochet #madebyme

11AM
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Married 70 Years, Died 15 Hours Apart
Kenny and Helen Felumlee were introduced when they were teenagers - by Kenny’s ex-girlfried. After dating for two years, the couple decided to get married. Immediately. Even though Kenny was only two days shy of his 21st birthday - the legal age for men in Ohio at the time - the pair drove to Kentucky to elope. They married on February 20, 1944, and spent the next 70 years together.
The couple raised eight children with Helen staying at home while Kenny worked for the railroad as a car inspector, ran a automobile repair place, and even carried mail for the town of Nashport. Helen was known for sending personalized greeting cards for any and every event, causing her family to joke that she “kept Hallmark in business.”
Once all their children had left the house, the Felumlees travelled. They visited all fifty United States by bus. They preferred that mode of transportation so they could see everything along the way.
According to their children Kenny and Helen never spent a night apart even preferring to share a bunk bed rather than sleeping in separate beds on a trip. When Kenny became too ill to sleep in the bedroom, Helen slept on the floor nearby so they could stay together.
Helen Felumlee died on April 12, 2014 at the age of 92. Kenny Felumlee died 15 hours later on April 13, 2014 at the age of 93.
Sources: Zanesville Times Recorder and ABC News
(Image Helen and Kenny Felumlee, in the 1940s, is a family photo and courtesy of the Zanesville Times Recorder)
More marriage-related posts on Obit of the Day:
The DeCaros - Married 81 years
The Pawlaks - Died holding hands 
The Direnzos - Married 78 years
The Wrubels - Married 83 years, 129 days 

These couples always get me.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Married 70 Years, Died 15 Hours Apart

Kenny and Helen Felumlee were introduced when they were teenagers - by Kenny’s ex-girlfried. After dating for two years, the couple decided to get married. Immediately. Even though Kenny was only two days shy of his 21st birthday - the legal age for men in Ohio at the time - the pair drove to Kentucky to elope. They married on February 20, 1944, and spent the next 70 years together.

The couple raised eight children with Helen staying at home while Kenny worked for the railroad as a car inspector, ran a automobile repair place, and even carried mail for the town of Nashport. Helen was known for sending personalized greeting cards for any and every event, causing her family to joke that she “kept Hallmark in business.”

Once all their children had left the house, the Felumlees travelled. They visited all fifty United States by bus. They preferred that mode of transportation so they could see everything along the way.

According to their children Kenny and Helen never spent a night apart even preferring to share a bunk bed rather than sleeping in separate beds on a trip. When Kenny became too ill to sleep in the bedroom, Helen slept on the floor nearby so they could stay together.

Helen Felumlee died on April 12, 2014 at the age of 92. Kenny Felumlee died 15 hours later on April 13, 2014 at the age of 93.

Sources: Zanesville Times Recorder and ABC News

(Image Helen and Kenny Felumlee, in the 1940s, is a family photo and courtesy of the Zanesville Times Recorder)

More marriage-related posts on Obit of the Day:

The DeCaros - Married 81 years

The Pawlaks - Died holding hands 

The Direnzos - Married 78 years

The Wrubels - Married 83 years, 129 days 

These couples always get me.

11AM
Meet Peach!  He’s brilliant blue and hard to photograph, but Arthur likes him.

Meet Peach! He’s brilliant blue and hard to photograph, but Arthur likes him.

April212014
“Let us endeavor so to live that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.”

Mark Twain, who died on April 21, 1910 at the age of 74.

Read his original NY Times obituary.

(via obitoftheday)
April202014
Happy Easter table!

Happy Easter table!

April192014
Arthur’s first time dying eggs!

Arthur’s first time dying eggs!

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